dmd.hashw

hi, i'm ameer hashw

r&d technician & bldg manager
lego lover | from mpls

Rep. Karen Clark, DFL-Minneapolis, for example, saw the open purse as a chance to grab some money for the poor, requesting $400 million in bonding to fix up public housing “creating the same number of [construction] jobs as the stadium, coincidentally.”

Or not coincidentally.

Rep. Morrie Lanning R-Moorhead, sponsor of the stadium bill, called Clark’s amendment “not germane” and “another attempt to spend money we don’t have.”

I swear, he did this with a straight face.

Vikings stadium sausage making. (via edkohler)

Airport ‘Nude’ Body Scanners: Are They Effective? | Wired

The body scanners rolling out to airports nationwide may violate travelers’ privacy, and they might even cause cancer.

But they prevent terrorists from wreaking havoc. Or do they?

Some research claims the machines — which produce a virtual nude image of the body — might not detect explosives or even guns taped to a person’s body. The U.S. government has reservations about their efficacy, as well. And even proponents of the technology concede the machines are not designed to detect so-called “booty bombs” — explosive devices concealed inside the human body.

“It’s not a possibility of the technology,” said Peter Kant, executive vice president of Los Angeles-based Rapiscan Systems, which has deployed 250 of its backscatter X-ray devices and another 250 are on the way. “None of the body scanners used by TSA are capable of doing that. They’re not designed to do that nor is it a requirement.”

Along with potential health issues, the efficacy of the so-called “advanced imaging technology” scanners will be a key issue Thursday when a high-profile lawsuit filed by the Electronic Privacy Information Center is heard by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. EPIC is challenging the TSA, which last year began placing about 500 of the $180,000 machines in 78 airports nationwide. Hundreds more machines are to be deployed this year.

——

“While there is no silver bullet technology, advanced imaging technology is a highly effective security tool which can detect both metallic and nonmetallic threats, including weapons and explosives,” Sarah Horowitz, a TSA spokeswoman, wrote in an e-mail. “Using this critical technology, TSA routinely detects artfully concealed metallic and nonmetallic prohibited items.”

Horowitz added that the machines detected more than “130 prohibited, illegal or dangerous items at checkpoints nationwide since January of last year.”

Oral arguments in the lawsuit are scheduled for 9:30 a.m. EST on Thursday. Threat Level will cover the hearing from the courtroom.

Lets do some math. 

500 machines (and counting) x $180,000 = $90,000,000.

$90,000,000 / 130 prohibited, illegal or dangerous items (most of which were likely things like nail clippers, etc. forgotten by passengers) detected by the machines = $692,307.69 per detected items.

By the way, only 130 items detected about of the millions of passengers that have flown throughout the United States since January of last year? Something tells me that these machines are terribly ineffective. But hey, we’re stopping those terrorists, right? 

Using systems to covertly scan pedestrians “would be a clear violation” of laws against unreasonable searches, McCall says. “If you are walking down the street, this allows them to digitally strip-search you and rifle through your belongings without any sort of justification,” she says.
Homeland Security studies privacy implications of technologies before they are used on the public. The department dropped the two projects “before we even got to the privacy assessment phase,” Whithorne says.
Homeland Security has sought for several years to develop technology that can scan moving people, and has publicly tested equipment at a New Jersey rail station and at airports in Denver and Minneapolis.

Homeland Security looked into covert body scans - USATODAY.com

Republicans, want to save the US some money? Defund Homeland Security and the TSA, and bring back some dignity to our country.

(via kaching)

jakke:

blissandzen:

Is China Really Funding the US Debt? 
More reality-oriented information to prepare you for the onslaught of ignorance.

This is an excellent chart - although lumping together “US Individuals and Institutions” as one category obscures some noteworthy holdings, like the over $1055 billion of US government debt held by the Federal Reserve specifically. This is approximately the same level of holdings as the Chinese and Hong Kong governments, and it’s noteworthy for several reasons:
Federal Reserve holdings of US Treasury bonds are rising really steadily - like, at the rate of several billion dollars per week. 
The Federal Reserve would never offload that debt even if there was uncertainty about the government’s ability to repay, since it’s their job to maintain stability in the US economy.
Much of these holdings are purchased through quantitative easing, which is an almost-magical process whereby the Federal Reserve creates new dollars to buy bonds.
So within that big 42% category, a large (and rapidly growing) share is held by an institution which is trying desperately to maintain economic stability in the US and has the ability to print new money to purchase more bonds. This isn’t to say that US government debt isn’t a concern in the longer run, but it’s definitely a long ways from a Greece- or Ireland-type situation.
  High-res

jakke:

blissandzen:

Is China Really Funding the US Debt?

More reality-oriented information to prepare you for the onslaught of ignorance.

This is an excellent chart - although lumping together “US Individuals and Institutions” as one category obscures some noteworthy holdings, like the over $1055 billion of US government debt held by the Federal Reserve specifically. This is approximately the same level of holdings as the Chinese and Hong Kong governments, and it’s noteworthy for several reasons:

  1. Federal Reserve holdings of US Treasury bonds are rising really steadily - like, at the rate of several billion dollars per week
  2. The Federal Reserve would never offload that debt even if there was uncertainty about the government’s ability to repay, since it’s their job to maintain stability in the US economy.
  3. Much of these holdings are purchased through quantitative easing, which is an almost-magical process whereby the Federal Reserve creates new dollars to buy bonds.

So within that big 42% category, a large (and rapidly growing) share is held by an institution which is trying desperately to maintain economic stability in the US and has the ability to print new money to purchase more bonds. This isn’t to say that US government debt isn’t a concern in the longer run, but it’s definitely a long ways from a Greece- or Ireland-type situation.